Spanish Easy Consonants

SPANISH EASY CONSONANTS

Despite some little differences, there are several consonants that receive the same pronunciation both in Spanish and English. The following guide attempts to cover the general rules for the pronunciation of them. Remember, though, that the emulation of a native speaker can help a lot when it comes to actually sounding like a pro :

  • CH receives almost the exact same pronunciation as that in the English word “child”.
    Examples: “chacal” (jackal), “chelín” (shilling), “chocar” (to crash), etc.
  • F receives almost the exact same pronunciation as that in the English word “field”.
    Examples: “forma” (shape), “fábula” (fable), “fe” (faith), etc.
  • K also receives a very similar pronunciation in both languages, although the Spanish version is somewhat softer than the English one.
    Examples: “kiosko” (kiosk), “kurdo” (Kurdish), etc.
  • M sounds the same both in Spanish and in English.
    Examples: “mercado” (market), “maracuyá” (passion fruit), etc.
  • P is another letter that receives a very similar pronunciation in both languages, although the Spanish version is softer than the English one (less air is expelled).
    Examples: “padre” (father), “pobre” (poor), etc.
  • Q (almost invariably followed by a “u”) receives a pronunciation similar to the English letter “k”.
    Examples: “quietud” (stillness), pronounced “kee·eh·tood”; “quirófano” (operating room), pronounced “kee·ro·fah·noh”; “quemar” (to burn), pronounced “keh·mar”; etc.
  • S receives almost the exact same pronunciation as that in the English word “simple”.
    Examples: “sable” (saber), “sonda” (catheter), “semilla” (seed), etc.
  • T is yet another letter that receives a very similar pronunciation in both languages, although the Spanish version is quite softer than the English one (significantly less air is expelled).
    Examples: “tarde” (afternoon), “tigre” (tiger), etc
  • W is not a very common letter in Spanish, and it’s usually found in words that are derived from other languages. As such, it receives almost the exact same pronunciation as that in the English word “wander”.
    Examples: “wáter” (toilet), pronounced as the English word from which derives (despite its rather distorted meaning); “windsurfista” (windsurfer), also pronounced as the English word from which derives.
  • Y sounds the same both in Spanish and in English.
    Examples: “yeso” (cast), “yugo” (yoke), etc.

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